Book Review · Feminism · Gender · Literature · Sexuality

Female Sexuality in Literature

Prior to the 1900’s ideas regarding sexuality, particularly female sexuality, were fairly restricted and taboo. Modes of sexuality that breached the norm such as homosexuality and sexual liberation amongst women were “viewed as deviant”[1] and if a woman promoted sexual self-confidence and assertiveness, they would be severely frowned upon. However, during the sexual revolution of… Continue reading Female Sexuality in Literature

Book Review · Literature

Identity in Literature

‘Identity’ refers to “the collective aspect of the set of characteristics by which a thing is definitively recognizable or known”[1], in other words, what makes a person unique or distinctive. ‘Identity’ as a theme can be a somewhat problematic concept, however, because authors and poets often construct complex and unfathomable characters. Writers will often construct… Continue reading Identity in Literature

Book Review · Literature · Reading · Writing

The Concept of Time in “To the Lighthouse”

In modernist literature, “Time comes to be conceived as a complex phenomenon composed of different temporalities or speeds, and in which past, present and future interpenetrate”[1]. This is recognised in James Joyce’s renowned modernist novel Ulysses, in which “the close connection between time and matter is heavily emphasised.”[2] Joyce uses stream of consciousness as a… Continue reading The Concept of Time in “To the Lighthouse”

Book Review · Gender · Reading · Sexuality · Writing

Gender & Sexuality in “The Well of Loneliness”

Only in recent years has the recognition – and respect – of ‘sexual inversion’ begun to emerge; sexual inversion “was the medical term used in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries to explain the phenomenon of homosexuality”[1] as an innate reversal of gender traits. To elaborate, the female invert was inclined to stereotypically male… Continue reading Gender & Sexuality in “The Well of Loneliness”

Book Review · Feminism

Feminism in “The Bell Jar”

Betty Friedan’s 1963 book, ‘The Feminine Mystique’ was ground-breaking in its dealing with a period in women’s history in America which had previously been overlooked. Although set a decade earlier, Sylvia Plath’s ‘The Bell Jar’ was published during the same year as Friedan’s book and it “explores the very problem that was Friedan’s subject”[1]. She… Continue reading Feminism in “The Bell Jar”